Charity Registered charity no. 1032154 Member since July 2016 Donate now

Latest news

Planting our one millionth tree: a Trees for Cities milestone

Planting our one millionth tree: a Trees for Cities milestone

On 20th March 2019, we planted our one millionth tree on the grounds of St Thomas' Hospital, just opposite Houses of Parliament on the southern end of Westminster Bridge. This momentous milestone was marked in in style, with Sir Michael Palin attending and pupils from Dormers Wells Infant School reading out poems in celebration of trees.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Please click below to find out more about what's next for #GenerationTree:

https://www.treesforcities.org/stories/a-million-trees-planted-what-next

The Lost Words: reconnecting children with enchantment of the natural world

The Lost Words: reconnecting children with enchantment of the natural world

The Lost Words, the award-winning book by Robert Macfarlane and Jackie Morris, is an impassioned response to the removal of everyday nature words - among them "acorn", "bluebell", "kingfisher" and "wren" - from a widely used children’s dictionary, because those words were not being used enough by children to merit inclusion. What began as a book has since got children, teachers and parents excited about exploring the natural world again, with classes and entire schools venturing out into woods, parks and gardens to discover more about their surroundings.

Please click below to read about our campaign launch at Beam County Primary School, Barking & Dagenham.

https://www.treesforcities.org/stories/the-lost-words-campaign-has-lift-off

Intreeducing: the hazel

Intreeducing: the hazel

The hazel has been an integral part of human life from ancient times, providing sustenance through its delicious nuts and wood for everyday needs. Its death-defying ability to grow after being cut right back became a fundamental part of how woods in this country provided the basic housing and living materials for ordinary people as well as organised industry. Using the process of coppicing, people living and working in the woods created a forest environment that sustained both humans and nature.

Click below to read more about the many ways in which humans and wildlife alike benefit from this small tree.

https://www.treesforcities.org/stories/intreeducing-helpful-hazel