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THE KIGALI SUMMIT JUNE 2020

THE KIGALI SUMMIT JUNE 2020

WE WILL BE SUPERCHARGING THE FIGHT AGAINST MALARIA AND NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES.

The Kigali Summit on 25th June 2020 will super-charge efforts to end malaria and neglected tropical diseases.

The summit will bring a united global focus on ending these preventable diseases that have been devastating the world’s poorest and most vulnerable people for thousands of years. The Summit is being co-hosted by two global partnerships tackling the diseases, the RBM Partnership to End Malaria and Uniting to Combat Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Held on the sidelines of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in Kigali, the Summit will capitalise on the presence of the Heads of State of countries who represent almost two-thirds of the global burden of malaria and neglected tropical diseases.

For malaria, this meeting will advance the agenda set by the Commonwealth leaders in 2018 to halve malaria cases in Commonwealth nations by 2023 and will mark progress and spur action against this significant milestone as well as global malaria reduction and elimination targets for 2025 and 2030.

By coming together now, the two health communities aim to share knowledge and resources to accelerate progress towards global goals aimed at ending malaria and neglected tropical diseases within a generation.

These diseases are united by the fact that they are diseases of inequity; they disproportionately affect women, children under five and people living in extreme poverty or remote communities.

For the link to to our YouTube Video, click here

WE’RE CELEBRATING THE 2 BILLIONTH MOSQUITO NET!

WE’RE CELEBRATING THE 2 BILLIONTH MOSQUITO NET!

2 billion mosquito nets are keeping people malaria-free across the globe. A community effort that’s helped create one of the greatest health success stories of our time.

Hundreds of millions of children can now sleep safely at night without the risk of contracting malaria.

More than a decade ago this photo of Clementina Akinyi was taken after having received her first mosquito net. A decade later she is thriving as a student in Mombasa, Kenya. She is one of the millions whose lives have benefitted from the life-saving mosquito net.

While these are astonishing successes, where there are still people dying of malaria, we continue to fight.

If we’re going to end malaria, we need to expand coverage of mosquito nets to reach those who are the most vulnerable. 39% of pregnant women and children under 5 living in sub-Saharan Africa still don’t have access to a mosquito net and are at the greatest risk.

We need to stay ahead of the evolving mosquito. By securing funding for research we can create the next generation of net that can combat insecticide resistance, or by using data discover where the nets are most needed.

With your support, together we continue to keep up the fight.

THE WORLD MALARIA REPORT 2019 IS HERE

THE WORLD MALARIA REPORT 2019 IS HERE

The annual World Malaria report from the World Health Organisation is the most up to date summary of data on the fight against malaria. The 2019 report, released in early December, shows that despite an unprecedented decline in the global malaria burden between 2000-2015, overall rates of progress have plateaued for a third year running.

Pregnant women and children in Africa continue to bear the brunt of this epidemic, with children under the age of five accounting for two thirds of global malaria deaths in 2018. The countries with the heaviest burden of malaria continue to face the most challenges, with over half of all malaria cases concentrated in just six African countries – Nigeria, DRC, Uganda, Cote d’Ivoire, Mozambique and Niger.

However, there is also cause for optimism. More countries than ever nearing the goal of zero malaria - including Malaysia, China, and El Salvador. 27 countries reported less than 100 cases in 2018, up from 17 in 2010, and four more were certified as malaria-free by the WHO in 2018 and 2019 – Algeria, Argentina, Paraguay and Uzbekistan.

Whilst the report highlights progress in two key high burden countries – India and Uganda – it emphasises the need for accelerated action across all malaria endemic countries. Again there are reasons to be optimistic – the Global Fund replenishment in October this year will see increased funding and resources to fight malaria and strengthen health systems over the next three years.

"We have the knowledge and the power to defeat malaria. Now, we need to step up action and innovation to make a malaria-free world a reality." (James Whiting, CEO)

Political leadership is being shown through national and international commitments, such as the 2018 commitment to halve malaria across the Commonwealth by 2023. Next year will offer leaders the first chance to review progress towards this target at the 2020 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Kigali, Rwanda.

British government, civil society, science and businesses are playing a vital role in supporting initiatives. From the UK’s £1.4 billion pledge to the Global Fund, to helping to secure the Commonwealth commitment last year to halve malaria by 2023, the UK government has demonstrated that it is committed to driving progress.

It is vital that we channel all of our efforts to ramp up global innovation, political action from malaria endemic and donor countries and sustainable investment in research and development for new malaria-fighting tools, or face slipping down the slope of resurgence. Now, more than ever, we need to accelerate progress in the fight to end malaria. What we need is the right tools, in the right place at the right time, to ensure that we will be the generation that ends malaria for good.

The report is available here.